Riverside Museum

Riverside Museum

Housed in a new, landmark building on the banks of the River Clyde, the Riverside Museum – subtitled “Scotland’s Museum of Transport and Travel” – is a vibrant celebration of Glasgow’s importance as a transport innovator.

Inside, you’ll find a vast and glorious collection of vintage and modern vehicles, including trams, buses, locomotives, subway cars, train carriages, taxis, cars and motorbikes, as well as numerous models of famous Clyde-built ships such as the Queen Mary and QE2. There’s a strong emphasis on social history, too, with a range of atmospheric re-creations – don’t miss the Victorian subway station, complete with rolling stock, and a 1900s street where you can visit various shops, including an Edwardian photography studio and a 1930s café.

Much thought has been given to access. There are twelve Blue Badge spaces right outside the museum, and another six in the main car park; there’s also a disabled drop-off point at the entrance. With a front door you could drive a bus through, there’s no problem getting inside. The reception desk has a lowered section and – like all customer service points – is fitted with a hearing loop. Lifts provide easy access between the ground and upper floors, and virtually the whole attraction is barrier-free. Many exhibits have accompanying audio or video displays; some are loop-compatible and some video displays have BSL interpretation. Visitors are encouraged to touch many of the exhibits, to help enhance the experience. There are three fully accessible toilets on the ground floor and one on the first floor.

Food & drink: An upstairs coffee bar gives great views of the river and serves very fine coffee. Downstairs, hot food is served in the spacious café, which has table service.